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Emergency Medicine

Emergency Medicine(814) 443-5433

The Emergency Department at UPMC Somerset is open 24/7 with providers treating serious and life-threatening illnesses and injuries. If you or a loved one is experiencing an emergency, please pick up the phone and dial 9-1-1 to get the help you need.

Our 15 bed department is staffed by experienced emergency medical providers as well as specialty certified nurses that take great pride in delivering expert care to all our patients.  We care for our patients using a teamwork approach which includes caring, dedicated, competent professionals and state-of-the-art treatment, technology and equipment. Our services include treating heart attacks, stroke, and trauma. UPMC Somerset Emergency Department is able to provide our patients quick access to all of the specialty services available through the UPMC Medical System. 

Choose the Emergency Department over an Urgent Care Center if you’re experiencing symptoms, such as:

  • Chest pain or other heart attack symptoms
  • Head injury
  • Sudden and severe headache or loss of vision
  • Heavy bleeding that won’t stop
  • Deep cuts or puncture wounds
  • High fever
  • Severe breathing difficulties
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Constant vomiting
  • Domestic violence, rape, or other physical assault
  • Feelings of suicide
  • Severe burns

Emergency Department Treatment

Our Emergency Department uses a sorting system called triage, not a first-come-first-served order, to treat our patients. During triage, a specially trained registered nurse will assess you to determine what Emergency Severity Index (ESI) level 1-5 scale you fall in with 1 being the most critical.

This sorting process ensures our patients with the most serious injuries or illnesses are treated first. For example, if a patient arrives with chest pain, he or she is treated before you if you arrived earlier but have a swollen ankle. Heart attacks have priority over earaches, and complicated fractures are treated before smaller cuts.

Anyone with a perceived emergency medical condition should go to the closest emergency department or call 9-1-1 immediately.

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